Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Save The Forest Hills Tennis Stadium: Landmark Letter Campaign for An International Icon!‏


Please take a few minutes to help preserve the historic Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, an IMMINENTLY ENDANGERED AMERICAN & INTERNATIONAL ICON. 

Classic postcard of a classic! LANDMARK or the dumpster?
  
The Problem....

Remember the 1963 demolition of Penn Station as New Yorkers watched in awe? You may be too young, but you get the picture. That led to the establishment of the Landmarks Law in 1965, to prevent further demolition of our landmarks that read NY all over it. The difference here is that the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium reads more than NY! After a vote on August 19th by a percentage of West Side Tennis Club members with voting rights, the historic Forest Hills Tennis Stadium may be sold to a developer, who will likely demolish it for a residential development. The greater public, who the Stadium was built for, will be excluded from the voting process. Wouldn't it be wise and more reputable for the WSTC to keep the Stadium or sell it to a reputable developer who will value,  restore, & adaptively reuse an International icon? Will this be Queens' Penn Station? Whether you are or aren't a WSTC member, there are ways that the "greater public" can still take action to defend an ICON!

Lookout below for 2 urgent routes towards preservation 
~ OR~
A prime facet of history will be gone forever!

 Forest Hills Tennis Stadium Significance....

The Forest Hills Tennis Stadium is truly an American & International icon in terms of tennis, musically, and architecturally. It was the first concrete stadium of its type in the country, and was referred to as the "World Capital of Tennis." Some prominent tennis players included Bill Tilden, Helen Wills, Althea Gibson, and Arthur Ashe. The facade is embellished with eagles, shields bearing the West Side Tennis Club logo, and grand historic archways. It was the home to the U.S. Open, singles championships, Wrightman Cup, Davis Cup, and a number of firsts in tennis history. It was also home to music festivals starring Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, Simon & Garfunkel, Diana Ross, Judy Garland, Trini Lopez, The Who, Barbra Streisand, Johnny Mathis, The Monkees, etc. A key scene in "Strangers On A Train" (1951) by Alfred Hitchcock took place at the Stadium. The Tudor Clubhouse dates to 1913 (Famed Architect Grosvenor Atterbury & John Almay Tompkins), and the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium dates to 1923 (Famed Architect Kenneth M. Murchison). The West Side Tennis Club helped establish the sport of tennis in the U.S. Forest Hills is known for tennis, and tennis is known for Forest Hills. Sadly, the West Side Tennis Club has neglected an icon, letting it sit somewhat abandoned, after the U.S. Open needed a larger space than 14,000 seats in the late 70s, and the WSTC did not promote it as much for music festivals or smaller matches. Photos, memorabilia, history: 

ROUTE #1 - HOW YOU CAN HELP PRESERVE AN ICON:

 *URGENT LETTER CAMPAIGN

Based on the above significance and your own sentiments, please write a letter supporting landmark status to the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission. The Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, Clubhouse, interiors, and grounds should be calendared for a public hearing ASAP. If restored and adaptively reused for smaller concerts and smaller tennis matches, it would enhance the appeal of the neighborhood, and preserve a historic icon. Jet Blue can be a sponsor. Breathable space is prime, and we do not need typical condos in a neighborhood accustomed to overdevelopment. City Landmarking will preserve the historic Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, Clubhouse, grounds, & interiors for future generations to cherish, increase the chances of funding for repairs, and ultimately enhance our quality of life.

Please e-mail the Landmarks Preservation Commission a letter requesting landmark status ASAP. It can be brief, yet meaningful. 


CONTACT:

- LPC Chair Robert Tierney: rtierney@lpc.nyc.gov
- LPC Dir of Research Mary Beth Betts: mbetts@lpc.nyc.gov

- LPC General mailbox: comments@lpc.nyc.gov 

- LPC Exec. Dir. Kate Daly: kdaly@lpc.nyc.gov   
- Rego-Forest Preservation Council Chair Michael Perlman: unlockthevault@hotmail.com 
 
ROUTE #2 - HOW YOU CAN HELP PRESERVE AN ICON:

Inform any contacts (members) that you know of at the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium to vote against the plan to sell the historic Stadium to a developer, who will very likely demolish it for a condo. Keep in mind that the vote to sell the stadium is slated for August 19th, which follows the informational meeting at the West Side Tennis Club (1 Tennis Place, Forest Hills, NY) on August 10th.

Please help by composing a brief letter to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, and also forward this preservation campaign posting to all your contacts. Time is of the essence!

Thank you,


- Michael Perlman

Rego-Forest Preservation Council, Chair
unlockthevault@hotmail.com

The Stadium hosted annual music festivals, attracting thousands. Still have those ticket stubs?
Althea Gibson: 1st African American woman to be a competitor on the world tennis tour, & 1st to win a Grand Slam title in '56. 
Vintage magazine explains how the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium is the heart of the West Side Tennis Club!

21 comments:

  1. My letter to the Landmarks Preservation Commission:

    Dear Mr. Tierney,

    I was born (in 1935) and raised on Burns Street, literally in the shadow of the Forest Hills Stadium. I attended countless matches of the professionals in June and the amateurs in September in the years before the Open. I took part in War Bond rallies and Red Cross benefits during the 40's. It was a source of great pride to me that historic concerts took place right across the street from me.

    When our section of Forest Hills was created in the 1920's as an adjunct to the Russell Sage/Forest Hills Gardens urban experiment, the Stadium was the lure for people all over the world, and really put "Forest Hills" in the forefront of championship tennis. The legendary events and long-lasting memories of this stadium are more than extraordinary; they are what endeared central Queens to national and international sports aficionados for two generations.

    We've always known that developers have had their eyes on this parcel. We urge you to consider very carefully any move to demolish what is Queens' most deserved landmark.

    Sincerely,

    Paul Noble

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  2. To Landmarks Preservation Commission & Elected Officials:

    As a person who was born and raised in Queens and who spent the great majority of his adult life residing in New York City, I am greatly dismayed that one of the borough’s oldest and most venerable landmarks is in jeopardy of being sold and possibly razed for redevelopment. I am referring to the historic West Side Tennis Club Stadium located in Forest Hills, NY.

    Besides the handsome architecture of both the Stadium and the Clubhouse, the Stadium and its grounds hold great cultural significance for not only the City, but the entire Country. Of course, its greatest legacy is the role it played in popularizing the sport of Tennis in the U.S. and as long time host of the U.S. Open. But let us not forget historic concerts and music festivals that saw the likes of The Beatles, Frank Sinatra, Barbara Streisand, Judy Garland, The Who, Johnny Mathis, Woody Allen, Harry Belafonte, Count Basie and many others grace its stage.

    Too many times, significant structures in the outer boroughs are passed over for landmark designation (or even consideration), in favor of sites in higher profile locations across the River in Manhattan. I implore you to consider the West Side Tennis Club Stadium in Forest Hills for immediate Landmark designation and help honor and preserve its remarkable heritage for future generations.

    Sincerely,

    Edmond Solero

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  3. To LPC and Politicians:

    I came across the fact that the Tennis Stadium and Clubhouse in Forest Hills would be considered to be demolished, and the land would be developed into condominiums. I felt somewhat disappointed that I or others would never get to visit or revisit this rich-in-history and special-to-American "landmark".

    To me as I did not grow up here, I did not know about the existence of the tennis stadium. Which is a shame because it is so worth to know about those historic place that had served many important events as well as its architecture. I currently live in Queens and I found it kind of sad that Queens had been forgotten and it could have be a getaway place for people who lived in the city.

    Especially Forest Hills, its history over 100 years old, and it's too bad that only the Forest Hills Gardens is really the only place had preserved its beauty. There are less and less places to let us to look back to the history in the city, and it would be even lessen if the Tennis Stadium and Clubhouse are gone.

    It is strange when visit Forest Hills there was not much left like the horse barn had actually closed and not need to mention the tennis stadium would soon determined to be demolished? I would strongly suggest to reconsider the alternative destiny for the tennis stadium and clubhouse. If the infrastructure and recreation facilities were available to the public in the neighborhood, that would attract more people to visit or people would love to stay and live longer in that area. The Tennis Stadium and Clubhouse had such a potential to be a place for the public to use or a getaway from the chaos of the city. I believe more residential buildings would not improve the value of the neighborhood, but the infrastructure and the accessibility of recreation facilities does. Please reconsider!!!!

    Thank you.

    Pik Chu Ahmetaj

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  4. I strongly support to keep the tennis club. It is crazy to destroy the history for a condo!
    The Austin street and nearby neighborhood are already much crowed. The schools are over enrolled.
    We have many ways to solve the financial problem. Selling to developer is not the only way.
    Forest Hills Gardens is the few places with its own character in NYC. Please don’t destroy it.
    Our children and grandchildren will blame us to turn a historical site to a condo.
    Xu Liu

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  5. Thank you for your comments, Xu Liu! Very well phrased. Selling a historic site to a developer for any form of residences is indeed not the only route to pursue. Can you please send us an e-mail at unlockthevault@hotmail.com?

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  6. I live in the Gardens, but am not a member of WSTC. The demise of the Stadium would sadden me, but I am wondering what you see as the alternative. As I understand, the WTSC is not in great financial shape, and could use the money to pay off debts and rehab its remaining facilities. If the stadium were to be Landmarked, who do you think would step in to rescue it? If WTSC had the money, they would have done it by now. If you have a benefactor in mind, speak up. If it is landmarked, WTSC will just continue to have a crumbling white elephant on its hands. Did landmarking save the RKO Keiths?

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  7. I'm a former WSTC member and I truly think that it is a pity that the stadium become another sore- even if architecturally perfect- new addition to Forest Hills.
    Much have been said about the richness of its history and else so I do not have to repeat this here. I would like to mention that the decision for the sale is exclusively that of the voting members of the private club that owns the stadium: The West Side Tennis Club, voting members including some with vested interest in the sale are only playing members , not the social members or the corporate members so the decision if it is to sell have been tightly controlled and it is most likely a fact.

    A fact that unfortunately "landmark status " will not come fast enough to reverse

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  8. To the last 2 anonymous bloggers, et al:

    While it is true that the vote to sell the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium to a residential developer lies within the hands of the board of directors of the West Side Tennis Club and its members with voting rights, they should acknowledge that the historic & iconic Stadium was conceived for the greater American public and other countries. It holds great meaning architecturally, culturally, and helped tennis become a national sport, and played a dominant role in music.

    The opinions of the greater community and greater majority should be taken into account, rather than selling and demolishing any bit of an icon for "a quick buck" to pay off debts and feed the dumpster literally. The West Side Tennis Club should be an ally, and therefore sell the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium to an organization which understands the definition of value, and will either use it as a tennis school, for smaller tennis matches, small concerts, community events and fundraisers, or a tennis museum. Forest Hills-based Jet Blue can be one of the first sponsors. On NY 1 News, the WSTC indicated that they are not entertaining those offers. For some reason, WSTC President Kenneth Parker and his board are only interested in considering and voting upon Cord Meyer Development's proposal. Isn't it more productive to maintain an open ear, and be on the side of the community and nation?

    City and state landmarking will help open the door to funding for a restoration of an icon and a family destination. Rego-Forest Preservation Council and affiliated preservation organizations will bond together and raise the money as well, if it is guaranteed to be allocated towards the Stadium's restoration and upgrades.

    Anonymous #2 mentioned the RKO Keith's Theatre. That theater is not fully landmarked. Only the lobby and ticket booth (a small percentage) is, since "a politician" campaigned to rid its recommended status by the LPC, and won.

    If a site is marketed properly, and the greater community bonds together, it is a catalyst for successful adaptive and creative reuse. The WSTC sat back for years, and let an icon deteriorate. At least former WSTC Pres. Jack Leiber and the board began an effort to restore it in 2004, unlike the current President who declines to comment to the press to date.

    On the basis of the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium being an architectural and cultural icon, it is also more durable structurally than one thinks (verified by a source). Sure there's some neglect, but the fact that it is falling down is a ruse by the WSTC to pave the way towards demolition in its entirety or in part for "quick funding."

    Great places such as Rome were not built in a day, and it took a series of masterminds to build them, so the WSTC shouldn't suit their own interests by destroying an icon in a day. They should consider its layers of rich history and societal impact, and how much heartbreak it would convey, as well as how their reputation would be forever tarnished if demolished due to greed.

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  9. Dear Landmarks Preservation Commission,

    I am writing to urge you to grant landmark status to the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium. We missed the mark with the Trylon Theater on Queens Boulevard and look at how that has turned out!

    With so much of this area being turned over to developers who have no respect for the history of the area (to say nothing of a sense of style), you could be instrumental in restoring one of its jewels. A site that housed a Beatles concert will always trump a yuppie crib!

    Thank you very much for your time and attention.

    Sincerely,

    Dorothy Black

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  10. Dear Chairman Tierney,

    I am writing in regard to the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, a truly an American and international cultural icon, in need of preservation. Development has been allowed to run rampant through this city over the last few years and we are losing historically significant architecture at an alarming rate. If restored and reused for musical concerts and sporting events, the stadium would enhance the appeal and value of the neighborhood, creating a destination for tourists as well as a viable venue for local residents.

    Please add this location to the calendar for landmarking status as soon as possible. Our city is over-developed and becoming just another generic urban area with no unique identity. The Forest Hills Tennis Stadium is worth saving and preserving not only its location, but also as the living history of New York City.

    Sincerely,
    Laura Goggin

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  11. Opposition To The Sale Of The West Side Tennis Club Stadium‏

    Dear Robert Tierney, Mary Beth Betts, and associates at the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission:

    I would like to write to you briefly this afternoon to ask for your support to immediately declare the Stadium at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills a historic landmark.

    It's evident from hearing community activists and reading the news that the West Side Tennis Club is tentatively planing to sell off this property to developers. We can only assume its future demolition in favor of other "lucrative" residential and commercial projects.

    While I cannot possibly speak on behalf of the West Side Tennis Club's current financial situation and goals, I can say personally as a previous sponsor of their professional tournaments, that it was just a few years ago that the club was hoping to restore the stadium to its original glory. At the time, they had just resurfaced the court and were using it annually for their lady's championships in August, preceding the US Open in Flushing.

    I would be shocked that in just a few years that the consensus of the club's board and members has shifted to sell off this property unless there was a tremendous short-term need to raise capital. I have never met a soul at the club or elsewhere who didn't share the feeling that this Stadium was a special place worth saving.

    How is it that an obvious shortsighted strategy to raise capital could lead to the destruction of such hallowed grounds? One would think that there must be a more creative plan to save this portion of the West Side Tennis Club so that it could serve, once again, as the invaluable cultural venue for the public to enjoy. This was, after all, its intended purpose.

    Sincerely,

    Tedd Kanakaris

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  12. John L. Gann, Jr.August 5, 2010 at 5:46 PM

    My letter from July 28, 2010

    Subject: West Side Tennis Club, Forest Hills, Queens
    From: John L. Gann, Jr.

    Dear Mr. Tierney:

    I understand that sale for condominium development of the renowned West Side Tennis Club stadium in Forest Hills is being considered and is to be voted on in about three weeks. Because of the special character of this facility and of the Forest Hills neighborhood, I believe the Commission would do well to consider according it landmark status at the earliest opportunity.

    I grew up in neighboring Kew Gardens and went to junior and senior high school in Forest Hills. But to nearly everybody outside the neighborhood—to people around the world, in fact—the name “Forest Hills” has had just one meaning: the U.S. capital of tennis. That’s pretty impressive for a residential area in an outer borough.

    The West Side Tennis Club stadium put Forest Hills on the map. Nothing it could be replaced with could come close to the distinction this facility has conferred.
    That matches moved years ago to Flushing Meadows doesn’t really change this. Without the historic association with the sport, Forest Hills might be just another nice neighborhood in Queens, an East Rego Park.

    There are neighborhoods and suburbs called Forest Hills in other cities. There is only one Forest Hills that’s had any status or recognition beyond its local area. Forest Hills isn’t Forest Hills because it has apartments, since virtually every neighborhood in Queens has apartments, and arguably Forest Hills already has more than its share. With still more apartments on the site in question, Forest Hills won’t be more Forest Hills. But it may become less.

    In the business world, a long-standing, well-known, and well-regarded brand is considered an extremely valuable asset to a company, not just in sentimentality but in dollars and cents. Some companies have in recent years even revived discarded brand icons (like Mobil Oil’s flying red horse) with that in mind. The stadium remains an irreplaceable reminder of Forest Hills’ unique “brand” that confers distinction on the neighborhood and has helped make it such a sought-after residential location for so long.

    A picture of a winged horse can be brought back: a demolished building cannot.

    Nor can a gathering place for sports, concerts, or what-have-you that is as “green” as this stadium. The LIRR is just a few steps away, the subway and bus routes only a few steps more. And to many living in apartments on Queens Boulevard and Austin Street, it’s a walkable destination. In a time of uncertain future energy availability and prices and global warming concerns, such a facility has significant value. And not everyone in Queens always wants to go into Manhattan for a good time.

    I hope the Commission will consider not only the historic significance of the New World’s Wimbledon in Forest Hills but also the economic and environmental import of having this landmark continue to add value to the neighborhood and to the city. There are other places to build new housing, and perhaps—to preserve value for the owners--development rights on the stadium site could be transferred to another location in the neighborhood or elsewhere.

    But there’s never going to be another Forest Hills tennis stadium or anything nearly as significant for the pride of the community. I hope the Commission can find a way to work with the West Side Tennis Club to make its preservation happen.

    John L. Gann, Jr.

    P.S. I was trained as a city planner, have prepared land use and historic preservation ordinances for Cleveland and other cities, and now function as a consultant in marketing cities.

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  13. My letter sent to the Landmarks Preservation Commission. Please do the same.

    Dear Sir / Madam:

    I am writing to you not only as a resident of Forest Hills but as a proponent of structures and buildings that hold a piece of history.
    If you ask anybody in the world to describe Forest Hills and what it is known for people would say Tennis and the Stadium. By destroying this magnificent structure, you would be ripping away what Forest Hills is known for. It would be like tearing down the Empire state building would be to Manhattan.

    My window faces the stadium and every morning I look out and admire it's beauty. How this building is not landmarked is truly disgraceful. It is reprehensible that some people would throw the stadium to the wrecking ball and make Forest Hills just another faceless place to pass through.

    Remember how Radio City music hall was almost torn down?

    Please PLEASE don't let that happen to our neighborhood's Jewel in the Crown.

    Sincerely yours,

    Patrick _______

    ~~~

    CONTACT:

    - LPC Chair Robert Tierney: rtierney@lpc.nyc.gov
    - LPC Dir of Research Mary Beth Betts: mbetts@lpc.nyc.gov
    - LPC General mailbox: comments@lpc.nyc.gov
    - LPC Exec. Dir. Kate Daly: kdaly@lpc.nyc.gov
    - Rego-Forest Preservation Council Chair Michael Perlman: unlockthevault@hotmail.com

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  14. From: irisgre@msn.com
    7/28/10

    The Forest Hills Tennis Stadium‏

    Attention: Chair, Robert Tierney

    Recently it has come to my attention that there is consideration to turn the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium over to a developer, who will very likely demolish it for a condo.

    This is not a very good idea and one that I hope you will not allow to happen. I grew up in New York and to me The Forest Hills Tennis Stadium is very special. As a young girl we used to make trips to the stadium; it was representative of a very special era in our cities history; it represents not only tennis, but architecturally is significant.

    The Forest Hills area is a very special area and it would be wise for not only the residents of Queens, but for all New Yorkers to preserve its originality and special nature. To have a developer come into the neighborhood and destroy the old stadium makes little sense. It is so easy to destroy things and so hard to create. It was the first concrete stadium of its type in the country, is internationally known, and was referred to as the "World Capital of Tennis."

    I understand that a vote will be taken August 19th. Let's not make a mistake that will be regretted. Vote to save the stadium.

    In addition to tennis, the stadium has been the venue for concerts. If restored it could be a great tourist attraction. I could see buses coming from Manhattan, to tour Queens and other historical sites throughout the borough. Also, it could be adapted for concerts and smaller tennis matches. Its restoration would enhance the appeal of the neighborhood, and preserve a historic icon. Green "historic" space is prime, and we don't need typical condos in a neighborhood accustomed to over development.
    Vote no! Don't let the developers have their way. We know the kind of damage they can do. It is unfair that the board of the West Side Tennis Club feels that only the members should vote on its potential sale on Aug 19th, and how the greater public (who the stadium was conceived for) is being excluded.

    Very truly yours,
    Iris S. Gretano

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  15. Mitchell Grubler, Queens Preservation CouncilAugust 5, 2010 at 5:58 PM

    Forest Hills Tennis Stadium complex‏

    7/26/10

    Dear Chairman Robert Tierney & Dir of Research Mary Beth Betts:

    On behalf of the Queens Preservation Council, I urge you and the Commissioners to calendar for a public hearing the West Side Tennis Club complex in Forest Hills.

    The West Side Tennis Club helped establish the sport of tennis in the US. Forest Hills is known for tennis, and tennis is known for Forest Hills.

    The Forest Hills Tennis Stadium is truly an American icon in the history of tennis of course, and also musically, and architecturally. It was the first concrete stadium of its type in the country, is internationally known, and was referred to as the "World Capital of Tennis." The facade is embellished with eagles, shields bearing the West Side Tennis Club logo, and grand historic archways. It was the home to the U.S. Open, singles championships, Wrightman Cup, Davis Cup, and a number of firsts in tennis history. It was also home to music festivals starring Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, Diana Ross, Judy Garland, Trini Lopez, The Who, Barbra Streisand, Johnny Mathis, The Monkees, etc. The Tudor Clubhouse dates to 1913 (Famed Architect Grosvenor Atterbury & John Almay Tompkins), and the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium dates to 1923 (Famed Architect Kenneth M. Murchison).

    Mitchell Grubler, Chairman
    Queens Preservation Council

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  16. Regina J. FaighesAugust 5, 2010 at 6:00 PM

    Landmark Status For The Forest Hills Tennis Stadium

    7/30/10

    Dear Mr. Tierney,

    I am writing to urge you to grant landmark status to the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium. Built in 1923, this 87-year-old structure was, for 62 years, home to the U.S. Open. Although the U.S. Open moved to Flushing, in 1978, many people still associate tennis with Forest Hills--and the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium is the reason for this.

    The famous stadium was featured in the Alfred Hitchcock movie Strangers on a Train, and in more recent years, it was used a venue for popular music concerts.

    Its age, its historical significance, and its interesting architectural features, such as its arches and columns, make it a neighborhood treasure that should be preserved and restored for posterity.

    With a little TLC, this grand old building could once again be a showpiece of our beloved Forest Hills community.

    Thank you very much for your time and attention.

    Sincerely,
    Regina J. Faighes

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  17. "The future of this historic stadium should be decided by the whole community, not just club members," [Anthony] Weiner said. "That is why we're making sure that all possible options are explored."

    http://www.qgazette.com/news/2010-08-11/Front_Page/Pols_Call_For_Tennis_Stadium_Landmark_Study.html

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  18. Thank you for bringing this article to our attention. One must admire quotations representing "government for their constituents." The majority represents a democracy.

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  19. Having grown up in Forest Hills, I want the stadium to be preserved--some things must remain sacred.

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  20. I was born and raised in Queens and have called Forest Hills home for the last 13 years. The disappearance of the mom and pop shops that actually provided the staples of daily life for this community is sad but all too common in todays environment of short term profits with no regard to long term sustainability. My decision to settle down in forest hills and buy in the gardens was based on years of watching other communities that once provided a cohesive sense of belonging and identity being ravaged by uncontrolled development with little or no regard for that developments future impact. It has driven people away who desire a quality of life that requires concern for the community and the environment and the entire character of the neighborhood goes from community to generic housing and local shopping replaced by large shopping malls and plazas. Forest hills and the gardens in particular offered me the community stability I desired. So the sale of the Tennis stadium to developers is an alarming prospect in my eyes. It is a concern for it's immediate impact on the community should large scale housing be it's fate since the pressures on traffic, parking, schools and transit are already overtaxed. But it is very important to save things of historical significance because you can not know where you are going with out knowing where you've been. And if a structure with so much history, architectural significance and cultural relevance can not be landmarked and saved from demolition and a buyer found who could make use of it as it was originally intended I think it is a sad statement on our current throw away culture.

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  21. the united states is the only country that destroys history. the reason of course is greed.i am shocked that a town such as forest hills would allow this.i always look out for the stadium when i pass by on the train and visualize hearing the beatles preforming.do not knock down this great stage of americana.

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